Ultra PRO Releasing New Booster Box Displays!

Number51x

Blasting off at the speed of light!
Member
This is completely aside from this product itself, it's just in response to this sentiment I'm seeing around here.

I don't really see any issue with wanting to collect sealed products as well as protecting them. I feel like there's this weird misconception around these comments that this exclusively for "resale" purposes. Some people just want to collect sealed Pokémon things. Whether it be packs, ETBs, booster boxes, etc. I have friends who are like this, collecting them just for the sake of collecting them. Even I collect a small handful of sealed products, namely with Empoleon on them, because it is a unique item with my favorite Pokémon on it, that is beyond just cards.

I also think it's perfectly fine wanting to preserve these types of things, given that they're a part of Pokémon history in a way- especially if they're scarce, such as things like older booster boxes. If I had a sealed Skyridge box, for instance, I wouldn't open it, as tempting as it would be. The cards in the box are much more common than the box itself.



These sealed products can have a collectible appeal to people, and thus, they can be considered collectibles. And if something is collectible, isn't it only sensible to want to protect the thing you're collecting? Especially if it's something like a booster box which can be easily damaged? There are tens of thousands of people out there who keep things sealed just to keep them as such, to keep that specific product as its own collectible. Wanting to protect a box isn't solely for value appreciation... And even if it was, It's just like keeping your cards in some sleeves and toploaders. It's so they stay in good shape. And much like @Citrus said, it helps with displaying a box instead of just leaving it on a shelf or whatever.

I don't see what makes this encouraging "disgusting" behavior.
I think the feeling here is that given the context of the last year, this product feels kinda gross. Under normal circumstances the worst anyone would likely have to say about it is that it's over priced. Today if feels like catering to the wrong crowd over all.
 

AshCo

What did you say about my nose?
Member
I keep cards in sleeves, sometimes 2x sleeves, because I handle my cards. Same with comics. I don't play with as many of them as often as I used to, but I'm glad I've used sleeves for many years and have cards from across the game's life in great--or rather, consistent--condition. Protection of game pieces (cause, lest we forget, that's what they are) makes sense regardless of the value of the card, for longevity as well as consistency.

This is not that. This is very clearly a product designed to preserve value for the secondary market. There is no game here, no value from a gameplay perspective, to be preserved. There is no reason to handle a box repeatedly. They aren't that fragile and they come wrapped in plastic. Protecting a sealed box of randomly distributed trading cards is protecting the potential value of the objects inside that box. I understand some people do that for fun, for collecting, whatever. I don't have a problem with them doing that, I do it too.

It is the monetization of this kind of behavior that disgusts me. This is a company that regularly interacts with tpci. They distribute cross-brand merchandise with them all the time. Now they are releasing something that encourages the consumer to put a sealed box on a shelf and call it a collectors item. Again, I'm fine with individuals deciding to do that, and I'm fine with them spending their money on whatever they feel best protects or displays that kind of thing. But this is designed to hold pokemon boxes specifically. This is designed to encourage sitting on product, to encourage consumers to protect that product not because it has gameplay value, or artistic value, or value as a card or cards to be traded, but because...? I can think of no other reason to encourage this specific kind of consumer behavior than an implicit promise of increased secondary market value with time.

And not only that, this has tpci's implicit seal of approval.

I'm shocked that anyone could be positive, or even neutral, about this product.

I think I'm more worried about the smug people who are going to try and make encasing your sealed boxes the norm, even when it's not fully necessary.

Like, I should clarify to you because I want to make sure my thoughts are being fully out here:

1: I don't think these cases are necessary for protecting your sealed stuff. Far from it. I apologize if my initial response seemed as if I did think it was completely necessary, I was merely just highlighting that people wanting to do it isn't exclusively for future profits.
2: I think this product itself isn't warranted for the price. Even if I kept a sealed box, I wouldn't do it. It's just nothing I care to spend the money on. It's not a good product in that pricing reason alone.
3: Like yourself, I don't care if people decide to use these or not.

I just don't think it's so black-and-white as to this being designed specifically and exclusively to encourage that implicit promise of value overtime. That was my only issue with the point you made. HOWEVER, I can see this as being Ultra Pro cashing in on all the Pokémon hype as of now. Which, at least to me, is just the same as any company making any product designed to cash in on what people are after, for more than one reason. I just think it's a lot more of a grey area, even if it is the company cashing in on something.

I don't have an issue with products for protecting boxes existing, but I can see that how the "influencers" and smug hype-beast fans or whatever getting impressionable fans to think that casing up boxes is the only way to protect them. I'm more concerned by the side-effects of what the fans are going to do with these kinds of products. Much like instantaneously valuing a card as if it were a PSA 10, regardless if it actually makes the grade or not, and making it feel like grading is the only true way to be a collector, when it isn't.

I hope this clears things up, and I don't want it to seem like I completely disagree with you with most of the things you said. There's reasons to be unhappy with this product existing, especially in the context of the time like @Number51x just said as I'm typing this. I'm just trying to say that there's more layers to it than just what you're saying.

I also don't think I agree with this specific point:
. Protecting a sealed box of randomly distributed trading cards is protecting the potential value of the objects inside that box.

You're looking at the box as if there's no collectability or value to it. Again, my example with something such as Skyridge. The value of a sealed Skyridge box isn't just the potential value of what's in the box, as there's no one card, no entire box's worth of cards that could ever be more valuable than the box itself, nor can there be a card that replicates what that sealed box is. At least in my eyes, even if I don't collect sealed boxes, I still am aware that there are plenty of people who are looking for a sealed box as its own unique collectible. They don't care about what's in the box, they care about the box itself. I have a friend who is collecting sealed Elite Trainer Boxes for purely display purposes. He values them as their own unique thing, and protects them to his abilities (not in cases or anything but he does shelve them with care and all) because he values them as such.

My point being, there's a lot more to protecting a sealed product than just because you want to protect what's inside of it. A lot of people who collect sealed products don't, for one second even consider the value of the cards inside of them. There's so much more to it than that.
 

Citrus

Aspiring Trainer
Member

For me personally?

A. Collecting single boosters doesn't take too much room. As opposed to booster boxes.

B. It's pretty inexpensive. Again compared to something like booster boxes.

C. And the biggest reason I enjoy having sealed product I think I can best describe as something akin to Schrödinger's cat. While a booster is sealed, it simultaneously contains all the rarest cards in that set. But as soon as it's opened, it just contains what it contained, more often than not nothing particularly special - perhaps a tinge of disappointment even. I like knowing that I could open that sealed product at any time for a sense of excitement.

One day I just realised that more often than not, a pack I forgot about for some time brought me much more excitement and enjoyment than one I opened immediately.

And also there is an element of what @AshCo described. I see it as preserving a piece of pokemon history. Once all the packs are opened... that's it, there are no more out there. I think it's nice to be able to preserve some of history for myself or someone else to enjoy. And in that sense, I'd disagree again and say that it does hold inherent value as art. 'Art' is a lot more diverse than the painting a lot of people define it as in their head.

Also to speak up for this product a little, although this speaks more to collecting and storing individual packs. But for years I would be on the look out for improved storage options that would fit packs well. The best I could turn to were small boxes that could fit around 8 packs stacked on top of eachother, but they neither offered great protection or had much of any display functionality. About a month ago though, cases specifically sized and intended for storing/displaying individual packs were released to my delight. They do a great job so I'm slowly in the process of updating my storage method. Something like these new cases mean I can handle my collection without worrying too much about how I handle them to avoid causing damage.

That said, this box case is horrendously over priced. So I hope they'd review that, but in general I support making these storage options available for collectors who may want them.

I hope that offered some perspective! I could write more reasons and detail but this is already very long - apologies.

I think the feeling here is that given the context of the last year, this product feels kinda gross. Under normal circumstances the worst anyone would likely have to say about it is that it's over priced. Today if feels like catering to the wrong crowd over all.

Certainly agree on that.
 
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Charmaster:)

Collecting, playing, & making family memories.
Member
Hey, I've seen products like this on the market before, and $40 is pretty close to the prices those boxes were selling for. In fact, it may even be a better price.
Also, if the factory shrink-wrap is like a penny sleeve, then this box is like a top loader. You're all right saying that a collector isn't gonna handle these, but accidents happen sometimes, especially in the presence of the statistical anomality known simply by the dreaded name of "children." :)
At any rate, it almost guarantees security against getting dented by fall damage or other unfortunate happenings that would damage the value and aesthetic appeal of a box. And you wouldn't want to replace a first edition base set Japanese booster box because your old one has a dent in the corner, would you.
That being said, I don't pretend to be an expert on the matter. I just wanted to point out the price similarity to existing products of this nature, the comparison to a top-loader, and the surprisingly undiscussed matter of inquisitive children.
 

signofzeta

Aspiring Trainer
Member
Could you imagine when you bought a booster box online (not second hand), or in any way where you don't get to inspect the booster box beforehand, and when you received it, it already had a dent? I probably bought booster boxes from a card shop, and they already had some slight imperfections in them. What are the odds of getting a booster box in perfect condition when you buy it? Do some of you ask the store to give you the entire stock of booster boxes, and then you pick the best looking one?

What is the true demand for a booster box that does not have a single scratch anyway? Would you be able to sell a booster box without a scratch for more than if you sold one that has a dent? Are people willing to buy a more expensive booster box just because it doesn't have a scratch?
 

Citrus

Aspiring Trainer
Member
Would you be able to sell a booster box without a scratch for more than if you sold one that has a dent?

Definitely.

Its obviously a sliding scale, a dent is extremely different to a superficial scratch on it's shrink wrap.

What are the odds of getting a booster box in perfect condition when you buy it? Do some of you ask the store to give you the entire stock of booster boxes, and then you pick the best looking one?

Pretty good, considering most people aren't looking to psa their box. Just avoiding significant dents in the box or tears in the wrap is sufficient. I can only speak to the card shops I frequent, but they don't tend store them in a running washing machine, so you're gonna get a box in perfectly fine condition at least 9 times out of ten. I'm sure if you had an issue you could just ask them to change it. It's not a big deal. And if you buy online you gotta understand you're rolling those dice a bit.
 

fleshrum

April in Kalos...
Member
Yeah, I'm quite sure we're on the same page, and have a lot in common when it comes to collecting. I just feel very strongly about this product in the context of current collecting trends.

The value of a sealed Skyridge box isn't just the potential value of what's in the box, as there's no one card, no entire box's worth of cards that could ever be more valuable than the box itself, nor can there be a card that replicates what that sealed box is.
This is very true! And also, this makes NO sense. The EV of a pack or box should be a determinant of overall secondary market price for that sealed product. Why else would the box cost a fortune? And yet I know from a couple of old Gym Challenge decks I've got, they are worth way, WAY more sealed than the totality of the easily acquired singles. I'm not disagreeing with this, I'm just saying I wish it weren't the case, and the interests of a responsible producer of these products would align with mine.

My point being, there's a lot more to protecting a sealed product than just because you want to protect what's inside of it. A lot of people who collect sealed products don't, for one second even consider the value of the cards inside of them. There's so much more to it than that.
When it comes to toys, or anything else where the product is known, I'd agree. I have some very old Beast Wars toys hanging in my room back home. Their value to me is not based on their market value, but that's in no small part because I know their market value, or at least could find it out. By your logic here, the collectors of sealed boxes for shelf candy ought to open the product and put the box in a case, because they don't care what's inside of it.

Again, I don't think we're on opposite sides of this, but I can't help but vent my general frustrations with the idea of this product and the kind of consumer behavior it encourages, and how antithetical that is to the trading, card, and game parts of the Pokémon Trading Card Game.
 

PatchampYoutuber

PokéTuber
Member
You can buy these way cheaper and just as well built from Viridian Forest and they have them specially made for Booster Box's, Elite Trainer Boxes and Build and Battle kits.

The ones for the Build and Battle kits are great and ive not really seen anywhere else do them tbh.

They have the Viridian Forest logo on one side but if you dont like that you can just put the product in the other way round, makes no difference

https://viridianforest.co.uk/collections/acrylic-case

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signofzeta

Aspiring Trainer
Member
Yeah, I'm quite sure we're on the same page, and have a lot in common when it comes to collecting. I just feel very strongly about this product in the context of current collecting trends.


This is very true! And also, this makes NO sense. The EV of a pack or box should be a determinant of overall secondary market price for that sealed product. Why else would the box cost a fortune? And yet I know from a couple of old Gym Challenge decks I've got, they are worth way, WAY more sealed than the totality of the easily acquired singles. I'm not disagreeing with this, I'm just saying I wish it weren't the case, and the interests of a responsible producer of these products would align with mine.


When it comes to toys, or anything else where the product is known, I'd agree. I have some very old Beast Wars toys hanging in my room back home. Their value to me is not based on their market value, but that's in no small part because I know their market value, or at least could find it out. By your logic here, the collectors of sealed boxes for shelf candy ought to open the product and put the box in a case, because they don't care what's inside of it.

Again, I don't think we're on opposite sides of this, but I can't help but vent my general frustrations with the idea of this product and the kind of consumer behavior it encourages, and how antithetical that is to the trading, card, and game parts of the Pokémon Trading Card Game.

Haha, I just overpaid for a bunch of Beast Wars because I feel the urge to complete the collection. The crappy part is, I want to play with my toys, but I don't want to open the ones that are sealed. I paid too much for the sealed ones. Out of the sealed ones I bought, I probably opened some of them, well the ones that I can find another copy sealed online. If I already owned the toy as a kid, and kept it all these years, even if the toy is in bad condition (flaking chrome, missing parts, broken parts, floppy joints etc.), it is in the bottom of my list. Just want to get the ones I don't have, sealed, or complete. Totally regret giving away the sealed Beast Machines Sonic Attack Jet I bought back when it was new, just because I already owned the Deluxe class Jetstorm toy. I like Sonic Attack Jet's color scheme better than Jetstorm's.

Could you imagine paying $300 for one sealed toy that used to cost 5 to $20 when it first came out? There is no way I would open it.

Man, I could totally use this for a sealed Transmetal 2 Blackarachnia. Nah, probably better to use it on a sealed Beast Machines Battle Unicorn. Could never find it.

Anyway, the Battle Styles box I bought was super warped, it's as if there are more booster packs on one side than the other.
 

Toybot

Aspiring Trainer
Member
I bought my 1st Ed. Booster Boxes in 1999 for about what newly released Boxes sell for. Now, those 1st Ed. Boxes are worth alot. It's about protecting it from damage like something banging against it or from getting wet or even getting dirty from dust(mines pretty dusty and it shows when you look hard enough). You also don't want the Seal Wrap to get damaged and torn off. Don't overestimate how many cards were actually printed in 2020 with the lockdown nor the worth of 2020 cards in the future.

FWIW, Cases like these go on Ebay for alot more but from what I can see, the Ultra Pro looks thinner.

Also for anyone interested in such a box- DO NOT GET MAGNET STYLE LIKE THIS.

Magnets DO NOT WORK. You maybe better off NOT using this case because the Box can still very easily push the cover out and fall onto the floor if you even tilt it just enough. It almost happen to me and I was already being careful cause I knew it could happen and was able to catch it from coming out in time.

Get a Screw Down Style. Ark makes great cases that are very thick and truly sealed. Once screwed down, there's very very little worry of any damage. Unfortunately they are very expensive and I have yet to find a decent screw down alternative.

Alternatively you can get something like this super cheap Ultra-Pro one then tape the cover shut really well. But then it looks ugly. Buuuut for those who can not possibly afford any better, it's a great choice if all you care about is protecting your boxes. Just make sure you tape it on AROUND the box so it really stays on till you can afford something better in the future.
 
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