Pokemon Neko's RealDex (PGO! Alternative)

Discussion in 'Beachfront Hangout' started by Nekoban Ryo, Jul 24, 2019.

  1. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    I don't play PGO, but I enjoy taking pictures of interesting insects, plants, etc. and sometimes stumble across things that have (or may have) inspired Pokémon. Here are some "Pokémon" I've caught (on film) IRL—feel free to share some of your own!

    (Some of these may not be species-specific, but I feel that they would still translate into these Pokémon.)

    GEN. 1–3
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    Bulbasaur and Ivysaur were confirmed in an interview to be based on frogs. They may draw inspiration from tree frogs given its Grass typing. Their polygonal spots resemble those on some toxic frogs.
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    Being stockier than Bulbasaur and having obvious warts, Venusaur is most likely based on toads.
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    Charmander's English name suggests that it may be based on salamanders, which are associated with the element of fire in Japanese mythology.
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    Squirtle is based on baby pond turtles. Though mainly terrestrial, box turtles are members of the American pond turtle family.
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    Caterpie is based on swallowtail butterfly caterpillars. Some species (including this one) extend a foul-smelling Y-shaped defensive organ from above their head when threatened.
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    Weedle represents the larval stage of a wasp. It also has characteristics of stinging caterpillars, called "kemushi" in Japan (which is also Weedle's Japanese category).
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    While it may represent wasp or bee pupae in general, Kakuna's characteristic of dangling from a silk thread (as seen in the anime and some side games) seems to have been inspired by hanging parasitoid wasp cocoons.
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    While based on an Asian giant hornet, Beedrill's green and blue Shiny palette may draw inspiration from cuckoo wasps.
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    Spearow is based on sparrows.
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    Paras and Parasect are based on insects that have fallen victim to a parasitoid fungus.

    The base insect appears to be a cicada nymph (see Nincada), but Parasect also bears an uncanny resemblance to red velvet mites, which themselves are parasites.
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    Despite its name, Venonat seems to be based (at least partially) on hairy, venomous caterpillars. Megalopyge-genus caterpillars are particularly round, so it may draw inspiration from those.
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    Venomoth seems to combine the idea of toxic moths (tiger moths) with the appearance of toxic swallowtail butterflies, such as the Pipevine Swallowtail (which may explain its Shiny colors).

    (NOTE: This is a Spicebush Swallowtail, a mimic of the toxic Pipevine Swallowtail. However, according to author Phillip J. Schappert, there's indication that even this species may be distasteful.)
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    Poliwhirl may be based on metamorph froglets (tadpoles with all four legs), despite lacking a tail. Poliwag would represent the tadpole with hindlegs, Poliwrath a froglet, and Politoed an adult frog.
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    Scyther is based on the Japanese Giant Mantis. While these don't occur in the US, the Chinese Mantis (North America's largest mantid) belongs to the same genus and was once considered part of the same species.
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    Pinsir is based on stag beetles.
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    The Helix Fossil (Omanyte) is based on ammonoid, ancient spiral-shelled squid, fossils.
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    Ledyba's Shiny palette seems to be based on the transitional yellowish stage of many ladybird species.
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    Ariados appears to draw inspiration from various spiders, especially orb-weavers. Its erect, spine-like "hind legs" suggest that spiny orb-weavers (Gasteracantha or Micrathena) may be among these.
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    This family is based on the life cycle of a dandelion.
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    While based on the Banded Darter dragonfly, Yanma's Shiny palette may draw inspiration from the Blue Dasher (or blue dragonflies in general).
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    Umbreon seems to be based on black cats. Several TCG cards suggest that Umbreon is more cat-like than other speculated origins (such as foxes and rabbits).
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    Pineco is based on bagworms whose cases superficially resemble pine cones, such as the Evergreen Bagworm. It also has characteristics of grenades or caltrops, perhaps referencing this species' destructive habits.
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    Dunsparce is based on the snake-like Tsuchinoko cryptid of Japan. While this creature has yet to be proven to exist, hornworms are sometimes mistaken for it.

    The hoop snake is essentially America's version of the Tsuchinoko. Long rumored to give chase to humans, some believe that the black racer (along with other colubrids) may have inspired tales of this cryptid.
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    Gligar's design seems to be a pun on "scorpionfly."
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    Mega Heracross is based on Hercules Beetles.
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    Beautifly is based on swallowtail butterflies.
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    Dustox is based on the Japanese Moon Moth, a close relative and lookalike of the American Luna Moth.
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    Seedot is based on acorns.
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    Surskit is based on water striders.
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    Masquerain seems to combine aspects of damselflies and moths with eyespots.
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    This family is based on the life cycle of a cicada—nymph, adult, and shed skin.
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    Trapinch is based on the larval stage of an antlion.
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    While representative of an adult antlion, Vibrava appears to draw more visual inspiration from mayflies. This may be a reference to the Japanese word for an adult antlion translating "thin-winged mayfly."
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    Flygon represents the adult stage of an antlion. Its design and association with sandstorms may be a pun on "sanddragon" dragonflies.
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    Corphish and Crawdaunt are based on crayfish.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019 at 6:14 PM


  2. ninetales1234 Biscuit Taste-Tester
    ninetales1234

    Advanced Member Member

    Lilligant is on-point with the colors! Wonder what the creator of this Pokémon was thinking about?

    Catch a real-life Vileplume and that will be really impressive!
     
  3. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    GEN. 4–8
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    Starly is based on fledgling starlings.
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    Burmy is based on bagworms.
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    Mothim represents the adult stage of a bagworm, such as the Evergreen Bagworm Moth, which only emerge from their bags if male. However, it draws more inspiration from hawk moths—especially Death's Head Hawkmoths.

    While these honey-thieving moths don't occur in the US, we do have species from the same tribe (such as the Laurel Sphinx pictured in the first photo). Mothim's split wingtips suggest that it may draw inspiration from the irregular outer margin of some species outside this tribe (such as the Small-Eyed Sphinx in the second photo), so Mothim could be interpreted as a general representation of Sphingidae.
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    Combee is based on honey bees.
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    Yanmega is based on the Darner family of dragonflies (though it may also draw inspiration from ancient griffinflies).
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    Pidove is based primarily on pigeons.
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    Sewaddle is believed to draw visual inspiration from Silver-Spotted Skipper caterpillars.
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    Lilligant is based on lilies. Since it evolves via Sun Stone, it may be based on daylilies.
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    Though its behavior is based on a tick, Joltik's appearance seems to draw more inspiration from jumping spiders.
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    Ferroseed seems to be based on cockelburs.
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    Shiny Volcarona's spotted yellow wings bring to mind Imperial Moths, a type of giant silkmoth.
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    Noibat may be based on mouse-eared bats.

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    Litten and Torracat are based on tabby cats (though the latter may also draw inspiration from tigers).

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    Pikipek is based on woodpeckers. (If the rumor about "regional evolutions" is true, I imagine that Pikipek would take a different path.)

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    Cutiefly and Ribimbee are based on bee flies. Ribombee may be based specifically on the Greater Bee Fly, being larger in size and having a dark patch (its scarf).
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    Drednaw is based on snapping turtles.

    No corpse flowers around here, sadly, but maybe I'll try finding one if I ever decide to travel. Not too many "Grass Pokémon" around here besides Hoppip and family (dandelions).
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019 at 6:03 PM
  4. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    Added Venusaur, Weedle, and Hoppip.

    I also elaborated on why I believe Dunsparce is a sphinx moth caterpillar. Click the theory link under inside Dunsparce's spoiler.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2019
  5. FourteenAlmonds Roasted, but not salty
    FourteenAlmonds

    Member

    It's pretty cool how Pokémon was originally based on bug collecting, and here you are "collecting" these real-life Pokémon!

    Were all these photos taken by you, or are you using photos taken by others as well?
     
  6. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    Yep! I'm not sure if it was Pokémon that sparked my general interest in insects, but I do blame Pokémon for my interest in moths at least. I've been into them ever since I found a Rosy Maple Moth that reminded me of my favorite Pokémon, Shiny Dunsparce.

    These are all my photos. :)
     
    FourteenAlmonds likes this.
  7. The Ωmega One Aspiring Trainer
    The Ωmega One

    Member

    These are really cool! I'm kinda jealous of the fact you get to encounter all of these beautiful bugs on what seems like a regular basis
     
  8. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    Added Jumpluff and Pidove. Not super interesting origins, but I figured I'd take pics anyway for the sake of the RealDex.

    Also, though I've been waiting for a bagworm moth to add Mothim to the list, it turns out that Mothim may be more closely-related to hawk moths (despite evolving from a bagworm). More specifically, it seems draw inspiration from Death's-Head Hawkmoths, as both have an orange-banded abdomen, a light marking on their thorax, and a tendency to steal honey from beehives as opposed to finding their own nectar.

    This isn't to say that Mothim's design doesn't draw from bagworm moths at all. The feather-like shape of its antennae and its "tail" may come from bagworm moths.

    There aren't any Death's-Head Hawkmoths here in the US, but we do have some species belonging to the same tribe (Sphingini). Of these, I've gotten photos of the Southern Pine Sphinx, Five-Spotted Hawkmoth, and Laurel Sphinx, but I'm not sure if any of these would really translate into Mothim. (Then again, I did use a box turtle for Squirtle...)

    I'm also reluctant to add Oddish. We've not got any true mandrakes here, but we do have mayapples (aka American mandrakes). These, however, look nothing like Oddish. They're a bit more reminiscent of Bellsprout (also said to be a type of mandrake), having a stem, leaves for "hands," and a yellow "head" (when ripe). If I ever find a native pitcher plant, I may combine the mayapple with Bellsprout's entry.

    EDIT: Taking another look at Mothim, its split wingtips may nod to the irregular wingtips/outer margin of some other sphinx moth species (such as the Small-Eyed Sphinx). Its tail, rather than being based on the Evergreen Bagworm Moth's "tail" (genitals), may represent the tailfeather-like poof at the end of others (like hummingbird clearwings). In either case, Mothim could be interpreted as a general representation of sphinx moths, not just the Death's-Head Hawkmoth. I think I'll add it to the list after all. :)

    Benefits of living near the woodline. :)

    EDIT: Added Joltik.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
    The Ωmega One likes this.
  9. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    Added Scyther and Ariados. I also had to divide the list into multiple post due to image limit.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  10. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    I'll probably wait until we've gotten the rumored chipmunks from Sword/Shield to add this to the 'dex, but it's possible that we've already seen Pokémon based on them!

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    We learned last year that Pikachu draws inspiration from squirrels. While its long ears may be inspired more by red squirrels, its cheek pouches, stripes, and size of its tail in comparison to its body are more characteristic of chipmunks (called shimarisu or "striped squirrels" in Japan) and ground squirrels. (The upright position of its tail while running is also characteristic of chipmunks.) Pichu, Plusle, and Minun may have similar origins. The more obvious squirrel Pokémon, Pachirisu, also appears to have chipmunk inspiration (sharing the cheek pouches and striped back), but its huge tail and 'dex entries suggest that it's more of a tree squirrel.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
  11. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    While visually based on a wasp/bee pupa, Kakuna's characteristic of dangling from a thread (as seen in some episodes of the anime as well as Pokémon Snap) seems to be inspired by some parasitoid wasp species, whose cocoons are spun on the end of a thread.

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    Without tearing apart nests or cocoons, this is probably the closest I'm going to get to a wasp pupa. (No, cocoons and pupae aren't the same things!)
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2019
  12. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    Updated Dunsparce and Mothim with additional photos.

    Note: One of the black racer's common names is "Hoop Snake," though it shares this with several other species.
     
  13. FourteenAlmonds Roasted, but not salty
    FourteenAlmonds

    Member

    I always thought the hoop snake was an Australian thing, like the drop bear, the yowie or the magpie.

    They bite their tail and roll around the bush like a wheel (hence, "hoop snake") until they come upon a confused human to eat...

    Spoopy :O
     
  14. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    The US, Canada, and Australia all have their own take on the hoop snake. I've never heard about them eating humans, just rolling after and killing them with their scorpion-like stinger. Granted, I haven't really looked into the Australian legends.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019
  15. Nekoban Ryo Schizoid Manchild
    Nekoban Ryo

    Member

    I found a Trapinch!

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    Antlion larvae, also called doodlebugs, lie in wait at the bottom of loose sand pits. When prey, such as an ant, wonders too close to the edge of the pit, it tumbles downward, unable to regain its footing, into the jaws of this voracious predator. Adults somewhat resemble dragonflies.

    I also added Yanmega, Combee, Ferroseed, Litten/Torracat, Skiploom, Ledyba (Shiny), and Seedot.
     

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